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Talk Tight
Talk TightTalk TightTalk TightTalk TightTalk Tight

Catno

SP 1194 SP 1194

Formats

1x Vinyl 12" EP Limited Edition

Country

US

Release date

Aug 25, 2017

Genres

Rock

Talk Tight is Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever’s first release, and it was originally released on CD in March of 2016 on Ivy League Records in the band’s home country of Australia. Talk Tight – a mini-album, or extended EP, if you will – garnered the band critical acclaim in their home country and in the US, where Pitchfork gave the record an 8.0 and described it like so:

Seven rip-roaring tracks that move by their own logic, any one of which could be a single and all of which leave you wanting more in the best way possible... Listening to these seven tunes, you can easily trace a national lineage: the relentlessness of Radio Birdman, the pop literacy of the Go-Betweens, the rambunctious energy of the Easybeats, and the belief—shared with Courtney Barnett—that guitars are not just crucial to the message but might very well be the message themselves.

This release is the first time Talk Tight has been available in the US, and the first time it is available on vinyl anywhere. The band released their Sub Pop debut, The French Press EP, in March of 2017, and they are currently working on their first full-length album

Media: Mi
Sleeve: M

$30*

*Taxes included, shipping price excluded

A1

Wither With You

A2

Wide Eyes

A3

Heard You're Moving

B1

Clean Slate

B2

Tender Is The Neck

B3

Write Back

B4

Career

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There's a fun story behind this album, retold in detail in the liner notes. In 1972, Michael Viner was an executive at MGM Records. Asked to put together some music for the soundtrack of an upcoming B-movie horror film, The Thing with Two Heads, he called on songwriter Perry Botkin, Jr., and the two of them whipped up a pair of songs called "Bongo Rock" and "Bongolia." By the middle of 1973, the songs, attributed to the Incredible Bongo Band, began to take off, both in Canada and on the U.S. R&B and pop charts, so Viner and Botkin took the concept to the next obvious level and cut an album, also titled Bongo Rock. Successful enough to scrape into the bottom of the Billboard album chart, the pair put together The Return of the Incredible Bongo Band in 1974 before fizzling out. There are some other pertinent details worth knowing, for example, that Jim Gordon, of Derek & the Dominos fame, was one of the key drummers on the project, and that Ringo Starr supposedly stopped in to bang out a few beats. But some of the best stuff happened long after the demise of the IBB, when early hip-hop DJs such as Kool DJ Herc and Grandmaster Flash, and then the Sugarhill Gang, Massive Attack and others, discovered the Incredible Bongo Band's recordings and began using samples from them. What started as a tossed-off filler session for a crummy flick took on a life of its own. This CD reissue contains not all, but most of the tracks from the two original albums, plus two remixes, "Apache (Grand Master Flash Remix)" and "Last Bongo in Belgium (Breakers Mix)." Interesting as it is to hear how the bongo-centric beats were toyed with by the hip-hoppers, the original recordings stand up on their own as classically kitschy cheese-rock. Bongos aren't the only sound heard, naturally, and fans of both lounge-rock and that crisp, reverby guitar sound prominent in old spy movies and Ventures records will dig what the IBB were all about. Their version of "Apache," the classic '60s instrumental mad
Emotional Rescue starts a non-defined set of reissues where some of the label’s favourite artists have lesser known, but (cult) classic songs unearthed, remastered, reappraised and then reinterpreted by contemporary producers and fans, for today’s DJs and collectors alike.To start, the idea of the legendary British psychedelic band Hawkwind appearing on the label might come as a surprise, but when the nature of songs and remixer involved is explored it makes perfect sense.Following the departure of Lemmy to the Motorhead hinterlands, the band’s sound took a wider but more defined style, including their burgeoning interest in electronics. With that, the 1976 album Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music contained a song that has become a secret spin for the more leftfield and adventurous. The Aubergine That Ate Rangoon – itself referencing cult psychedelic band Dr. West’s Medicine Show and Junk Band’s alien invasion opus The Eggplant That Ate Chicago – with it’s use of loops, synthesiser and motorik drumming is a short instrumental that has gained cult status in its own way. Focusing on much of Hawkwind’s musicality in one song, mixing psychedelia, fusion and humour with a killer groove, all in one short blast of repetition meets experimentation.This is backed with the album’s other stand out, in the beautifully laidback stoner vibrations of City Of Lagoons. Lanquidity rules as West Coast meets Floyd touches abound. A hazy Gilmour style guitar and heavy phasing and reverb drums underpin space rock key solos that carry you to the horizon.An Esteemed excavator, musician, compiler and oracle, the choice of Cherrystones to rework these instrumentals is a given. With two decades of production chops from beats, breaks and jazz for the likes of Stark Reality, Twisted Nerve and Brutal Music to the abstract, psychedelic acoustics for Whatever We Want Records, he has gone on to become a respected composer of soundtracks for Adidas, Stone Island and YMC.His heavy cover of The Aubergine pulls up the drum and bass and overlays freeform synth stabs atop a warped Riley arpeggio loop that takes the smoke hazed original and give it doses of codeine and rum. To close, his City Of Lagoons rework becomes ‘Head’ outtake overkill. Trippin’ beyond the light fantastic.Words from Cherrystones:“When the prolific and albeit consistent Emotional Rescue label & head honcho Maestro Chuggy proposed this as a potential project to me I was initially excited as much as honoured, but also hesitant. Why you ask? Because that which is close to the heart is often the most sacred and foreboding to envisage or should I say take out of context or possibly leave in context via sympathetic realisation.My history with Hawkwind is as murky as anyone that truly let the band into their hallowed cerebral bandwidth whilst following their smoke signals and oily pipes serenading the riff fuelled synth washed sunsets where dogs on strings jugglers tents and paratrooper boots were standard issue on stage and backstage. This is more than a mere band, these wrote the book on themselves, used pages to roll with and smoked their own scriptures and blew smoke rings that became parables with no care to any place scene or need to fit within or out.This entire project was created using no stems, no multi tracks hence we did not use remix as a theme, these are re-works which I made via intense manipulating and treating those hard. The parts added added and re-chopped with a view to colour these re-imaginations. It was essentially making a new meal but adding and subtracting flavours to create a new essence, a new sensation and believe it, it was not easy which kept it exciting and close to me.