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The Doors
Strange Days

Strange Days
Strange DaysStrange DaysStrange DaysStrange DaysStrange DaysStrange DaysStrange DaysStrange Days

Artists

The Doors

Catno

8122-79865-1 8122-79865-1

Formats

1x Vinyl LP Album Reissue Stereo

Country

Europe

Release date

Sep 14, 2009

Genres

Rock Pop

12" 180-gram HQ virgin vinyl reissues of the original stereo mixes of the legendary band's six Jim Morrison-fronted studio albums. The reissues of these now historic albums - all originally released between 1967 and 1970 - are replicas of the initial vinyl offerings, including artwork and inner sleeves. The laquers were cut at Bernie Grundman Mastering in Hollywood, CA under the direct supervision of original Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick and Electra Records founder Jac Holzman. STRANGE DAYS, first out in October '67, went to #3 and introduced the Doors classics "People Are Strange," "Love Me Two Times" and "Strange Days."

Media: Mi
Sleeve: NM or M-

$45*

*Taxes included, shipping price excluded

A1

Strange Days

3:05

A2

You're Lost Little Girl

3:01

A3

Love Me Two Times

3:23

A4

Unhappy Girl

2:00

A5

Horse Latitudes

1:30

A6

Moonlight Drive

3:00

B1

People Are Strange

2:10

B2

My Eyes Have Seen You

2:22

B3

I Can't See Your Face In My Mind

3:18

B4

When The Music's Over

11:00

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